TABL Turns Two!! (Actually Three. My bad)

Hello everyone!

Not much going on here but MY BABY IS TWO( ETA its actually THREE)! Admittedly, I haven’t been writing in here as much as I’d like to, but I’m glad to still be here. As always, I’d like to thank everyone for reading/skimming/lurking/visiting the blog, even if there hasn’t been much content published.

Wow… two three years is a lot of time (duh). I started this blog as something to motivate me to read my set novels for my studies but it completely evolved into something not different, but better. Here, I can share and express what’s on my mind regarding literature, and although I should do this more, see what other bloggers are writing about. WordPress has been a godsend to my life, and having a blog as a writer has its perks.

Since writing is going through a major shift from print to digital, it’s a great advantage for any writer to have a blog. This is because with the skills we learn from having one i.e HTML, SEO, content management systems, possibilities with jobs are endless (take that, naysayers that think Arts is a rubbish degree!). Plus, aside from journaling and working on manuscripts or articles, a blog is one more medium to exercise writing.

Anyway, I’m gonna celebrate with a glass (or two, or five) of some cheap Cabernet Sauvignon. I’ve got a night shift on tomorrow, so I’ll be just right getting on the sauce tonight (winky face emoji). But for now, ciao!

Vanity Unfair: When Do Publishing Companies Become Unscrupulous?

Hello, my sweets!

How are you all?  Hopefully good–and if you haven’t been good, I hope you’re feeling better.  Anyway, today’s hot topic is all about vanity publishing.  Since a lot of us are aspiring writers, it’d make our hearts leap if we ever see that a publishing company has taken interest in our submission/s.  We’d think that we finally hit the jackpot and our eyes sparkle at the possibility of making it big, baby!

Here’s where I say the big, dreaded ‘BUT’: What if there are publishing presses out there that are taking advantage of writers?  It turns out, I learned that some companies are doing this, and specifically, they target writers who either a) want to make it as a published author or b) are jaded and are tired of facing rejection after rejection.  This is where the vanity publisher comes in.

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On the Internet’s Seemingly Favourable Writing Program, Scrivener

[Disclaimer: This ain’t a paid presentation!  I’m getting exactly $0.00 for this post.]

How’s it going, guys?  We’re now into February (almost March), and before we know it, it’ll be bloody Christmas again!

Anyway, I just wanted to share my experience with the writing program Scrivener.  Initially, I was a tad bit sceptical of the program because I kept seeing praise for it online in places like Reddit and writing forums, and I thought that there seems to be some sort of annoying circle jerk around it.  However, I’m currently on a trial version of Scrivener, and I’m definitely planning on buying the full version.  So here on this post, I’ll be sharing my experience (so far).

Well then, what is Scrivener?

Scrivener is a writing program that is specifically designed to aid writers to formulate and draft their writing.  Although I’m currently using the program for my current project (a fiction novel), it can be used to write essays, short stories, non-fiction books, screenplays, you name it.  You could use it for basically anything.

How is it any different to using Word?

For starters, I personally think that Scrivener helps me be a bit more organised with my writing.  Before using this program, I used to have a few related documents–one doc being the manuscript, another for character profiles, and another for ideas and notes.  With Scrivener, everything is in one place.  The research, multimedia files, the character profiles, and any other notes or miscellaneous things are all there; I don’t have to keep on switching between word documents.

Okay, so we’re only hearing good things so far… is there anything that you don’t like about Scrivener?

Yes.  To a newbie, trying to figure out the cogs and wheels of the program is quite a challenge.  Usually, programs are intuitive and user-friendly, but Scrivener isn’t like that.  What I did was look up tutorials on YouTube to get the gist of the program, and then I used it the way I wanted to.  So yeah, it’s kind of complicated at first, and it may be discouraging to some other users.  Additionally, there may be too many features– many other writers online seem to use these features all at once while claiming that they’re all useful, but sometimes I find these features a little distracting and I end up not using some of them at all i.e. side notes.  Like the old cliché goes, less is more.

How is Scrivener helping you as a writer?

I think that there’s a slight improvement with my narrative writing skills, and one way of it helping me is with characterisation.  There are templates to character profiles (or y’know, there are many other templates online that you can tinker with), but I like the template provided because it helps me make a character that’s much more “deeper”, rather than a cardboard cut-out of a trope (I admit that characters in my old works were like this, and I’m planning on writing about that in a future post).  This may also be some wack, psychological thing, but I’ve noticed that I’m starting to get my groove back as a (n amateur) writer.  I think I’ve said in a previous post that my passion and motivation has kind of dwindled down in the past few years or so, but now I find myself working on my story almost every day, simultaneously with my Business Administration coursework.

Oh ffs.  Did Scrivener save a bunch of orphans from a burning building?

Yes.  Yes it did.

Anyway, the overall outlook on Scrivener for me is positive.  I like it because it has been a clever, useful, and motivational tool for my writing.  Also, this goes for every other program that exists: use it however you want to use it.  There are guides out there written by others on how to use Scrivener, but I found that their methods don’t really mesh well with me.  By no means is this post a shit on Microsoft Word, because I still use it to write documents such as reports, and it has a number of useful features unique to it, that Scrivener lacks.

This review piece might sound very circle-jerky and like a paid ad/review/similar BS, but I swear on the little bit of earth that’ll be my grave in about a hundred years’ time, this is an honest review with no outer influence.

So, what do you think of Scrivener?  Love it?  Hate it?  What’s your experience?  Leave your comments down below, and I’ll see you in the next post.  Keep chewin’ through those books!

new siggie again

Some Thoughts on Publishing

Today, I just want to put a few thoughts down on paper (or rather, a screen) in regards to book publishing.  There are many writers out there in the world, yet many of them are yet to be published.

Last year, I took a creative writing class and the tutor one day was talking to us about the publishing process.  He told us that it’s become increasingly hard for new authors to be published.  In fact, he had to strike a deal with some people in the US in order to get one of his books published.  Also, with Angus and Robertson (a major publishing company in Australia) now defunct, it’s become much more challenging for new Australian authors to have their books on a shelf in, say, Big W.   Continue reading